Commentary: Experts and Statesmen in the Time of Coronavirus

The Chinese virus is a clarifying agent. Among other things, one can see the choice between republican and progressive government—the rule of the people on the one hand and the rule of experts on the other. President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden perfectly embody this choice in response to the crisis.

Nowhere is this more evident than in the way the two men approach the expert advice of Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease and member of Trump’s COVID-19 Task Force.

Trump is adamant that he will listen to and consider what Fauci has to say, but in the end he, as the elected president, will determine the right course of action. For Trump, politics is the overarching art: immunology and epidemiology are subordinate sciences. Biden promises the opposite, saying “If I’m elected president, I will always lead the way with science. I will listen to the experts and heed their advice. I will do the opposite of what we’re seeing Donald Trump do every day.”

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Thirty States Have Issued Stay-at-Home Orders So Far

As of March 31, 30 of the 50 states have issued stay-at-home orders to residents. Although the names of the orders – shelter-in-place, stay-at-home, stay home, stay safe – vary from state to state, they include at least two common elements: the closure of nonessential businesses and requesting all residents to stay home except for essential trips.

California was the first state to issue a stay-at-home order. Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) did so on March 19. In total, 19 Democratic governors and 11 Republican governors have issued stay-at-home orders. Across all 50 states, there are 24 Democratic and 26 Republican governors.

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Commentary: Plastic Bags and the Recycling and Reuse Scam

Back in 2014, the California Legislature passed Senate Bill 207, which banned grocery stores from offering customers “single-use” carryout bags. Permanent implementation was delayed by a November 2016 voter referendum, Proposition 67, which unsuccessfully attempted to repeal the measure. Today it is well-established law.

The only way SB 207 was sold to the grocery industry was through an incentive that permitted them to keep the 10 cents per “reusable” bag that they would be required to charge customers.

California’s pioneering ban is touted by environmentalists as an example for the nation, and progressive cities and states have enacted similar laws. But in reality, it is a misguided policy that does more harm than good.

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Biden: Democrats’ National Convention May Have to Be Postponed

Former U.S. Vice President Joe Biden, the likely Democratic candidate in November’s national presidential election, says the coronavirus pandemic sweeping the country is likely to force significant alterations or postponement of the party’s national nominating convention scheduled for July.

The Democratic and Republican national conventions are a quadrennial showpiece of American democracy, but Biden told MSNBC late Tuesday that it is “hard to envision” the Democratic convention set for mid-July in the Midwestern city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, occurring as scheduled.

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Scientist Who Predicted Pandemic Blasts WHO: ‘They Set Us Back a Great Deal’

A world-renowned epidemiologist credited with predicting the coronavirus pandemic blasted the World Health Organization in an interview for creating a false sense of security that the virus could be easily contained.

“Many of us were incredibly disappointed for lack of a better word in the WHO and its response,” Dr. Michael Osterholm, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, said in a podcast interview published Tuesday.

“When you look at what WHO did I think they set us back a great deal because they made countries believe if just a few countries that were going to get this would just do the containment work, we could stop it.”

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Trump Administration Extends Delay of Court Hearings for Asylum Seekers

The Trump administration, citing continuing complications brought on by the coronavirus pandemic, is extending a delay of Migrant Protection Protocol hearings for asylum seekers in Mexico.

Foreign nationals under Migrant Protection Protocols, a program that holds asylum seekers in Mexico for the duration of their court proceedings, will have to wait longer before they can make their case before an immigration judge. All hearings scheduled through May 1 will be postponed, according to a statement by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) on Wednesday.

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Analysis: The Lethality of COVID-19

Given the spread of misinformation about Covid-19, Just Facts is providing a trove of rigorously documented facts about this disease and its impacts. These include some vital facts that have been absent or misreported in much of the media’s coverage of this issue. This research also includes a groundbreaking study to determine the lethality of Covid-19 based on the most comprehensive available measure: the total years of life that it will rob from people.

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Commentary: Remembering Senator Tom Coburn – He Stood Tall for Taxpayers

Former Sen. Tom Coburn was a hero among fiscal conservatives and endless source of inspiration and courage. The Oklahoma Republican embodied financial stewardship, always showing great respect for the hard-earned tax dollars of working Americans.

Coburn, who died late Friday at 72, helped the American people better understand the size and scope of Washington’s spending problem by highlighting government waste.

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3.3 Million File Unemployment Claims in U.S. – a Record Number

Nearly 3.3 million Americans filed unemployment claims last week, a record number as businesses were forced to shut down to help slow the spread of the novel coronavirus.

The U.S. Department of Labor reported Thursday that 3.28 million claims were filed in the week that ended March 21. That marked an increase of more than 3 million claims over the week prior, when 282,000 claims were filed.

The previous high in a single week, according to the department, was in October 1982, when about 695,000 claims were filed. The nearly 3.3 million claims filed last week is nearly five times the prior record.

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Commentary: Pelosi And Schumer’s Plan to Kill the Republican Party and Conservative Movement

Conservatives on Capitol Hill and in the media have been spreading the word about all the extraneous provisions Democrats have been trying to insert into the third coronavirus stimulus bill that is now before the Senate. And we should all be concerned about the massive spending and pork that Democrats want to add to the bill – but that’s not the worst part of what Democrats are demanding.

What conservatives must recognize as a life or death struggle for the future of constitutional liberty and the Republican Party are the election law changes that Democrats are demanding as their price for allowing the coronavirus relief bill to pass.

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Commentary: Giddy Democrats Exploit the Economic Crisis to Hurt Trump

President Trump’s policies have brought this country historic levels of prosperity, but Democrats have been predicting an imminent economic crisis from virtually the moment he was elected. Now, as the novel coronavirus sows panic in the markets, the president’s opponents are hoping they’ve finally found a way to hamstring the strong and growing American economy.

The Democratic presidential candidates, for instance, quickly began stoking fears of a possible recession caused by the coronavirus, preemptively asserting that it would be the president’s fault.

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Sanders, Biden to Debate Without Studio Audience

The last two major U.S. Democratic presidential candidates – former Vice President Joe Biden and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders – are debating Sunday night in a world turned upside down by the coronavirus pandemic, seated in a Washington television studio without any people attending it. 

The two long-time politicians will be trading their thoughts – and likely more than a few barbs at each other – over two hours.  

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Americans Could Face More Restrictions Due to Coronavirus

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said on CNN’s “State of the Union” Sunday morning that more needs to be done to reduce personal interactions throughout the country.

“I would like to see a dramatic diminution of the personal interaction that we see in restaurants and in bars,” Fauci said. “Whatever it takes to do that, that’s what I’d like to see.”

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Judge Orders Hillary Clinton to Appear for Deposition as Part of Judicial Watch Lawsuit

A federal judge on Monday ordered Hillary Clinton to appear for a deposition as part of a lawsuit filed by the watchdog group Judicial Watch, saying in a ruling that the former secretary of state’s written responses so far in the case have “left many more questions than answers” about her decision to use a private email system while in office.

Judge Royce Lamberth also granted Judicial Watch permission to depose Cheryl Mills, a top aide to Clinton at the State Department.

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The Minnesota Sun Adds New Daily Feature: Coronavirus Updates

Even as the coronavirus has claimed its first fatality in the U.S., The Minnesota Sun is adding a new reference feature to help you keep track of the virus’s spread in the country and around the world.

We are providing a badge using data from Worldometer near the top of the page. The Worldometer badge will always appear near the top of our homepage, just underneath the Top Story link.

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Carol Swain Commentary: A Dangerous Revisionist History of America’s Founding Pushes a False and Destructive Narrative

Under the guise of a venture called the “1619 Project,” revisionist history about race in America is being introduced into classrooms across America without undergoing the normal peer review expected of educational materials. August 2019 marked the birth of the project, a publication of The New York Times Magazine and the Pulitzer organization, containing a collection of essays and artistic works to commemorate the 400-year anniversary of slavery in America. The project has mushroomed into a movement to re-educate Americans via newfangled claims about how deeply racism is embedded in America’s core.

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Commentary: The Subversive Intentions of Our Mainstream Media

Many media observers will recall the New York Times’ response to Donald Trump’s unexpected victory in 2016. In their subtle, tacit admission that the paper had covered the election with some bias, publisher Arthur Sulzberger, Jr. and editor Dean Baquet promised to “rededicate” themselves to the fundamental mission of the Times and to bring “fairness” to their coverage.

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Iowa Democrats Extend Deadline for Candidates to Seek Review

The Iowa Democratic Party extended until Monday a deadline for presidential candidates to request a review of the results of the Iowa presidential caucuses, following a caucus night debacle in collecting votes that led to a dayslong delay in reporting the results and inconsistencies in the numbers.

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Commentary: Romney’s Discreditable, Dishonest Vote

What an unexpected sorbet Senator Mitt Romney (R-Utah) served up on Wednesday afternoon. After the shambles of the Democrats in Iowa; the president, during the State of the Union, shoving into the faces of the Democrats a cream pie in the form of his overwhelming policy successes; House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s tearing up of Trump’s speech at the podium in a demonic state of petulance; and the final collapse and disposal of the most inane official assault on the presidency in its history in the impeachment vote, Romney seems to have had an out-of-body freak-out.

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ACQUITTED: The Senate Votes to Acquit President on Both Articles 52-48 and 53-47

In an historic vote Wednesday, the U.S. Senate voted to acquit President Trump on both Articles of Impeachment.

Falling far short of the necessary two-thirds majority needed to expel a sitting president, Trump was acquitted 52-48 on the House of Representatives’ Article One charge of  “abuse of power.” The President was acquitted on the Article Two charge of “Obstruction of Congress” by a vote of 53-47.

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Commentary: Families Today Have More Schooling Options Than Ever, But Nowhere Near Enough

I am a glass-half-full kind of person, so while we could focus on the criticisms and some of the setbacks related to expanding educational freedom to more families, there is much more to celebrate than to lament. As National School Choice Week ends, it’s a great time to spotlight the growing variety and abundance of education options available to parents and young people.

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Commentary: Our Coming Debt Crisis

Ten to 20 years from now, we will not be talking about impeachment, and believe it or not, we won’t still be talking about Donald Trump either. We will be talking about our debt crisis. For all the good that came from this era, the Bush, Obama and Trump administrations will all be remembered as the ones that caused the crisis that will hammer our children and grandchildren. To understand where we are, it’s helpful to review the past few years of this issue’s development.

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Commentary: Bolton’s Alleged Assertions of President Trump’s ‘Preferences’ Are No Grounds for Impeachment

US Pres. Trump and Ukrainian Pres. Zelensky... and John Bolton

“President Trump told his national security adviser in August that he wanted to continue freezing $391 million in security assistance to Ukraine until officials there helped with investigations into Democrats including the Bidens, according to an unpublished manuscript by the former adviser, John R. Bolton.”

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