Seven Midwest States Enter Hydrogen Coalition

Seven Midwest states entered a coalition to pursue clean hydrogen development as an alternative to gas and diesel fuel.

The governors of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin signed onto the Midwest Hydrogen Coalition. The coalition will accelerate clean hydrogen development, from production and supply chain to distribution in agriculture, manufacturing, transportation, and other industries.

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Second Military Whistleblower Calls Minnesota Gov. Walz ‘Habitual Liar’

by Rose Williams   A second retired command sergeant major who served alongside Gov. Tim Walz in the National Guard is speaking out, saying the governor “left his troops high and dry” before a deployment to Iraq. Paul Herr served in the military for 34 years in a variety of…

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Minnesota School Board Wants to Scrap Public Comment to Silence Dissent, Residents Say

A Roseville parent compared the school board’s attempt to shut down public comment at board meetings to tactics used to silence dissenters in communist countries.

Even though parents and community members overwhelmingly opposed the policy change, the board is still considering passing the measure later this month.

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California’s Clean Car Rules to Take Effect for Just One Model Year in Minnesota

Because the state of California is amending its “clean car” emissions standards, Minnesota will be abiding by the old California standards it chose to adopt for only one model year.

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) admitted as much in a motion to dismiss a lawsuit brought against them by the Minnesota Automobile Dealers Association (MADA). The lawsuit argues the MPCA wrongfully outsourced its legal authority.

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Minnesota Licensure Changes Ask Teachers to Make Students ‘Agents of Social Change’

The Minnesota Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board (PELSB), whose members are appointed by the governor, is revising its “standards of effective practice” for teacher licensure that will apply to all new teachers when adopted.

According to the Center of the American Experiment, the changes will impact teacher licensure programs and “require aspiring educators to ‘demonstrate’ ideologically driven content in their coursework to obtain their teaching license.” This goes for educators who end up teaching at private schools, too.

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Minnesota Gov. Walz Declines Four Debate Invites, Jensen Says

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz is declining to participate in additional debates, Republican challenger Dr. Scott Jensen said in a press release Monday.

Walz and Jensen have only debated once so far this campaign season, meeting for the first time at FarmFest in early August. Since then, the governor has declined to participate in four additional debates, one at the Minnesota State Fair, another at Game Fair, a third with the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce, and a fourth on TPT Almanac, according to Jensen.

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State Report Confirms Violent Crime Skyrocketed on Walz’s Watch

Gov. Tim Walz’s administration waited until nearly 4 p.m. on a Friday afternoon to release a report showing violent crime has soared in Minnesota in back-to-back years.

In its annual uniform crime report for 2021, the Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS) said violent crime increased by 21.6 percent last year, a bigger jump than the 16.6 percent increase seen in 2020.

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Fourth Crisis Pregnancy Center Vandalized in Minnesota

A crisis pregnancy center in St. Paul was vandalized this week, marking the fourth attack on a pro-life group in Minnesota this summer.

Abria Pregnancy Resource Center in St. Paul was vandalized in the early morning hours Aug. 1, its executive director announced in an email to supporters.

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Government Spends $85K on Minnesota National Guard Advertisements in LGBT Magazine

Since 2019, the United States government has spent roughly $85,000 on advertisements for the National Guard in a Minnesota-based magazine geared towards the “LGBT community.”

The Washington Free Beacon reports that the U.S. Department of Defense has awarded tens of thousands of dollars in advertising funds to Lavender, a general interest print and digital magazine for a “local, national and international lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) and LGBTQ-friendly audience,” according to its website.

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‘Rise in Fentanyl’: Minnesota Reports Record Overdose Deaths in 2021

Minnesota experienced a record number of drug overdoses in 2021, according to a Department of Health report released Thursday.

There were 1,286 overdose deaths reported to the Minnesota Department of Health last year, a 22% increase from 2020. This means an average of nearly four Minnesotans died every day from a drug overdose, the report says.

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Live Babies Left to Die After Failed Abortions in Minnesota, Report Reveals

Several infants were left to die after being born alive during botched abortions in Minnesota in 2021, according to a state health report.

Abortion procedures resulted in the birth of live infants in five separate incidents, and life-saving measures were not reported to have been used in any of the incidents, the Minnesota Health Department report found.

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Minnesota AG Ellison Among 20 State Attorneys General Supporting National Gun Control Rule

A coalition of 20 state attorneys general, all Democrats, are backing a federal gun rule in court.

The Final Rule, as the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives named it, would enable law enforcement officials to trace any homemade guns used in crimes. In addition, the rule limits trafficking the weaponry.

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Major Pollster Labels Minnesota a Toss-Up as Walz Numbers on Crime, Education Tank

As poll numbers for Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz continue to fall, one major pollster has labeled the state’s gubernatorial race a “toss-up.”

RealClearPolitics, an independent poll aggregator and media company, is giving Walz an average point advantage of 3.5 over Dr. Scott Jensen, the Republican-endorsed candidate for governor.

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Complaint: 586 Duplicate Registrants on Minnesota Voter Rolls

An election integrity law firm has filed a complaint against Minnesota Secretary of State Steve Simon after discovering that nearly 600 duplicate registrants appear on state voter rolls.

With the assistance of the Upper Midwest Law Center (UMLC), the Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) has requested a hearing on the duplicate registrants at the Minnesota Office of Administrative Hearings in St. Paul.

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Report: Minnesota Has Second-Most Expensive Electricity Prices in the Midwest

Minnesota’s electricity prices are lower than just one state in the Midwest, according to data reported by the Center of the American Experiment.

Second only to Michigan, Minnesota’s electricity prices increased 22% from 2011 to 2021, reaching 11.12 cents per kilowatt-hour. This makes Minnesota’s electricity prices the 14th highest in the country — compared to 2001, when Minnesota held the position for 14th lowest in the country.

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Minnesota Has the Most Long-Term Care Facilities with Staffing Shortages, National Report Says

Minnesota’s share of long-term care facilities reporting staffing shortages is the largest in the country, Seniorly reports.

Seniorly’s April 8 report indicated about two of every five long-term care facilities in the North Star State are experiencing staffing shortages this year, up 18.4% since 2020.

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Minnesota Offers Up to $87K for New Prison ‘Tattoo Supervisor’

A job board maintained by the state of Minnesota is offering a prison “tattoo supervisor” position that could pay up to $87,000 with benefits.

The posting seeks applicants who are currently licensed as tattoo technicians, have at least three years of experience, and “possess a strong, well-rounded portfolio.” The hiring agency is the Minnesota Department of Corrections, the state’s prison system, and the work is full-time out of Stillwater.

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2020 Alcohol-Attributable Deaths in Minnesota Surpassed Previous Years’

Minnesota saw more deaths that were wholly attributable to alcohol in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic than in the previous three years, Minnesota Department of Public Health data show.

“The majority of alcohol-attributable deaths are related to chronic conditions that develop after many years of excessive drinking,” MDH Public Information Officer Erin McHenry told The Center Square in an emailed statement Wednesday.

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Exclusive Interview: Basketball Standout Royce White Runs for Congress Against Left Wing Squad Member Rep. Ilhan Omar

A Minneapolis-born college and professional basketball player told The Minnesota Sun and The Star News Network he is running for the GOP nomination to represent his city from Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District to unseat Democrat Rep. Ilhan Omar.

“I think Ilhan Omar’s in on it. I mean, I think she’s in on it with the globalists, the uniparty,” said Royce White, who was drafted in the first round by the Houston Rockets in the 2012 draft. “I think she’s a puppet for this entire agenda to undermine America as a nation and to usher in a new global authoritarian society.”

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Minnesota Basketball Standout Runs for Congress to Bench Rep. Ilhan Omar

The Star News Network’s national political editor, Neil W. McCabe, sat down with world-renowned basketball player Royce White to discuss why he’s prepared to unseat Minnesota congresswoman incumbent Ilhan Omar and her globalist agenda.

McCabe: Royce White was world-renowned as a college basketball player and was regarded as one of the most talented men to play in the NBA. White told The Star News Network why now he is running for Congress against Ilhan Omar.

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As Gas Prices Soar, Minnesota Gov. Walz Reverses, Calls for Federal Gas Tax Holiday

In a tough reelection battle this year, Gov. Tim Walz is changing his tune on gas taxes.

The Minnesotan joined five other Democratic governors urging the U.S. Congress to suspend the federal gas tax amid soaring prices at the pump caused by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and President Joe Biden’s ban on importing Russian oil this week.

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Public School Enrollment Continues to Fall in Minnesota

Private and charter schools are the beneficiaries of a continued decline in Minnesota public school enrollment.

Data from the Minnesota Department of Education’s annual report shows that compared to the 2020-21 school year, roughly 2,000 fewer students were enrolled in public schools for the 2021-22 school year.

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Redistricting Panel Sets New Political Boundaries for Minnesota

A judicial panel has finalized the boundaries that will shape Minnesota politics for the next 10 years.

The five judges appointed to a special panel by the Minnesota Supreme Court released the state’s new legislative and congressional maps Tuesday. The process, known as redistricting, happens every 10 years after the census and puts every legislative seat in the state up for grabs.

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Hennepin County Sheriff David Hutchinson Won’t Seek Reelection

Hennepin County Sheriff Dave Hutchinson won’t seek reelection in November, multiple sources told Alpha News.

This was confirmed Wednesday morning when Hutchinson told his staff that he has “made the difficult decision not to seek reelection in the 2022 election.”

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Exclusive: Jailed for Violating Walz’s ‘Indoor Service’ Ban, Lisa Hanson Shares What Her Ordeal Taught Her

The owner of Albert Lea’s now-closed Interchange Coffee and Wine Bistro told The Minnesota Sun she has learned the value of family and true friendship as she serves her 90-day sentence for violating Democrat Gov. Timothy J. “Tim” Walz’s ban on indoor service.

“Probably the biggest thing I miss about running the bistro is the guests,” said Melissa “Lisa” Hanson, who, December 9, began her sentence at the Freeborn County Adult Detention Center.

“To be able to provide a great product coupled with a unique atmosphere and thoughtful joy was to sit and observe,” she said.

“Whether it was a busy summer lunch with guests enjoying the patio under the pergolas or a ‘Live Music Friday Night’ watching the guests relax and enjoy themselves while all their worries melted away to the tunes the musicians were strumming or plunking out,” she said. “Seeing family and friends laugh and relax together was so special – these are some of the things I miss.”

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Kendall Qualls Steps Down from TakeCharge, Hinting at Run for Minnesota Governor

Republican Kendall Qualls announced Tuesday that he is stepping down as president of TakeCharge, a nonprofit he founded earlier this year, prompting speculation that he will be running for governor of Minnesota.

Qualls first gained notoriety in 2020 during his unsuccessful bid against Democratic Rep. Dean Phillips in Minnesota’s Third Congressional District. A few months later, he launched TakeCharge, which has focused on inspiring a “new movement in the black community to return it to its cultural roots of faith, family and education.”

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Minnesota Cities Are Preparing Coordinated Effort to Declare a ‘Climate Emergency’

Nearly 20 jurisdictions throughout the state of Minnesota are preparing a coordinated effort to declare a “climate emergency” this coming January.

Alpha News has obtained documents on the coordinated effort, including a one-page summary of the plan and a three-page resolution template.

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Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar Reveals Previous Breast Cancer Diagnosis, Successful Treatment

Minnesota Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar revealed Thursday that she was diagnosed with stage 1 breast cancer earlier this year and successfully underwent radiation therapy.

“In May, I completed a course of radiation treatment, and after additional follow-up visits, it was determined in August that the treatment went well,” she wrote in a Medium post. “Of course this has been scary at times, since cancer is the word all of us fear, but at this point my doctors believe that my chances of developing cancer again are no greater than the average person.”

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Minnesota Senate Majority Leader Paul Gazelka Steps Down

Minnesota State Senate majority leader Paul Gazelka stepped down on Wednesday in what some are saying is a likely precursor to entering into the race for governor. A statement from Gazelka said that he will be a part of Minnesota’s “future success” as he pursues “the next chapter” in his “political life.” Gazelka has held the majority leader position for five years. His letter, announcing his stepping down from the position, listed his accomplishments. He said that, “These accomplishments were possible because we stuck to our principles and communicated directly with the people of Minnesota.”

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Minnesota Senate Majority Leader Paul Gazelka Steps Down

Minnesota State Senate majority leader Paul Gazelka stepped down on Wednesday in what some are saying is a likely precursor to entering into the race for governor. A statement from Gazelka said that he will be a part of Minnesota’s “future success” as he pursues “the next chapter” in his “political life.” Gazelka has held the majority leader position for five years. His letter, announcing his stepping down from the position, listed his accomplishments. He said that, “These accomplishments were possible because we stuck to our principles and communicated directly with the people of Minnesota.”

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‘Unscientific Child Abuse’: Nurse Rebukes Mask Mandates at School Board Meeting

Anoka-Hennepin School District, the largest district in the state of Minnesota, updated its face mask guidance this week following 90 minutes of heated public comment.

At its August 23 meeting, the school board adopted a recommendation from the district superintendent to require masks on a case matrix model.

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Study: Minnesota Marriage Penalty ‘Hurts Families and Businesses’

Wedding venue

A new report released Wednesday lists the states with a marriage penalty on citizens’ income taxes.

The Tax Foundation, a non-partisan policy think tank, lists 15 states that penalize couples for being married.

Minnesota is one of those states. North Dakota and Wisconsin join the state in punishing marriage.

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University of Minnesota Professor Opposes School Hiring Police ‘in the City of George Floyd Uprising’

A professor at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities is pushing back against the school’s decision to hire more police officers.

Nate Mills, a professor of English, criticized the school in a tweet saying “In consistency with the city of Minneapolis, the University of Minnesota has decided, in the city of the George Floyd Uprising and continued racist police violence, that it too needs *more* police officers.”

In consistency with the city of Minneapolis, the University of Minnesota has decided, in the city of the George Floyd Uprising and continued racist police violence, that it too needs *more* police officers: pic.twitter.com/WANoIeaY5S— Nate Mills (@frozenagitation) July 23, 2021

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Minneapolis Cites Critical Race Theory as a ‘Framework’ for New Ethnic Studies Requirement

Thomas Edison High School

Minneapolis Public Schools explicitly lists critical race theory as a “framework” for its new ethnic studies graduation requirement.

According to left-wing critics, critical race theory is strictly a legal theory developed 40 years ago and since it isn’t explicitly referenced in some K-12 course catalogs, it therefore isn’t taught in the classroom at all.

But “ethnic studies” courses seem to be a popular vehicle for delivering CRT-inspired ideas to young students.

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Minnesota Governments and Associations Spent $10 Million Lobbying in 2020

Local governments are spending more taxpayer money on lobbying year-over-year, according to a report released Thursday by State Auditor Julie Blaha.

“Over the past five years, local government expenditures have increased by 11 percent on staff and contract lobbyists,” Blaha said in a statement. “When adjusted for inflation, the increase is approximately 4 percent.”

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Report: Minnesota Abortion Clinic Failed to Report 1,000 Abortions

Whole Woman’s Health in front of Supreme Court

An abortion clinic failed to report 1,000 abortions to the state last year, meaning abortions actually increased in 2020 and again surpassed 10,000.

Pro-life activists initially celebrated the Minnesota Department of Health’s annual report to the Legislature, which showed that abortions dropped to a record-low of 9,108 in 2020. But then Pro-Life Action Ministries’ Brian Gibson noticed that Whole Woman’s Health reported zero abortions for 10 months out of the year — an impossibility, since his activists observed women going in and out of the clinic every day.

So Moses Bratrud with the Minnesota Family Council called up the abortion clinic and was told there was a “reporting error.” In reality, Whole Woman’s Health performed 1,256 abortions in 2020, an increase of 1,119 over the 137 abortions the clinic initially reported, according to Bratrud’s report.

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Minnesota Schools Spend Big on Equity Consultants

School bus

Taxpayer-funded school districts across the state have spent huge sums of money hiring outside consultants to conduct “equity audits” and related work, in some cases using COVID-19 relief funds to cover the costs.

The primary beneficiaries of this scheme include Equity Alliance Minnesota and the Minnesota Education Equity Partnership, a group managed by a current state legislator.

In the Sartell-St. Stephen School District, school administrators entered into an $80,000 contract with Equity Alliance Minnesota last October, according to a copy of the contract recently obtained by a group of concerned parents.

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Minneapolis Has Experienced One of the Largest Homicide Increases in the Nation, Study Finds

A new study found that Minneapolis experienced the fifth-highest increase in homicides in the nation between 2019 to 2021.

The overall rankings were based on both a city’s current homicide rate and the change in its number of homicides across the last two years. Minneapolis landed in the 11th position overall, behind cities like New Orleans, Cincinnati, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Detroit, according to the WalletHub survey.

From the second quarter of 2019 to the second quarter of 2021, the city of lakes saw the fifth-highest increase in per capita homicides in the nation. In this time, Minneapolis endured the death of George Floyd, unprecedented levels of rioting, mass unemployment caused by COVID-19 lockdowns, and a political assault on its police department.

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Gov. Walz Requests USDA Help During Minnesota Drought

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz

Due to a severe statewide drought, Gov. Tim Walz sent a letter to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Tom Vilsack, requesting assistance to aid Minnesota’s livestock producers by relieving the immediate impacts of drought on grazing land.

“Agriculture is the past, present, and future of Minnesota’s economy. We must do everything we can to address the challenges our farmers and ranchers are facing due to the severe drought conditions plaguing our state. That’s why I’m asking the U.S. Department of Agriculture for assistance,” Walz said in a statement. “The USDA’s ongoing support of Minnesota’s agricultural industry is well-recognized across the state, and with their continued assistance, our livestock producers will have a brighter outlook as we endure these harsh conditions and look forward to a thriving future.”

Walz supported implementing a plan to allow emergency haying and grazing on eligible Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land counties experiencing Level D2 or greater drought conditions, reducing forage pressures on Minnesota’s livestock producers. The latest U.S. Drought Monitor update on July 8 reported nearly 40% of Minnesota is suffering under Level D2 or greater drought conditions.

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Report: Minnesota Election System ‘Weakest in the Nation’

A Minnesota think tank released a new report this week exposing flaws in the state’s election system and recommending a number of possible reforms.

The “‘vote now, check later’ verification process” that Minnesota uses for same-day voter registrants has a number of “weaknesses,” according to the report.

Minnesotans who register to vote prior to Election Day are subjected to a verification process before their vote is counted. Same-day registrants go through the same verification process but only after the election.

“Their vote is counted,” the report says. “The county auditor runs the same verification using the Department of Public Safety database and the Social Security database. But if a problem is discovered, it is too late, because the vote has already been counted.”

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Attorney General Ellison Announces $50 Million Settlement with Purdue Pharma

Keith Ellison

Attorney General Keith Ellison announced Minnesota will get $50 million from the settlement of the state’s lawsuit against the Sackler family’s company Purdue Pharma, which manufactured the opioid drug Oxycontin that contributed to the deadly opioid crisis nationwide.

The resolution will make public more than 30 million documents related to Purdue’s role in the opioid crisis and require the Sacklers to pay $4.3 billion for prevention, treatment, and recovery efforts in communities across the country.

Minnesota’s share of those payments is expected to exceed $50 million over nine years, the spending of which will be overseen by the State’s Opioid Epidemic Response Advisory Council.

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Left-Wing Politicians Push Claim That Chauvin Sentence Is Not ‘True Justice’

Screen cap in Hennepin County on Chauvin case

A slew of left-wing politicians and activists continue to push the rhetoric that Derek Chauvin’s sentence does not show justice, but only “accountability.”

Chauvin was sentenced to 22½ years in prison for the murder of George Floyd. In April, a jury found him guilty on all charges, which included second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter.

Following his sentencing Friday, Rep. Ilhan Omar released a statement implying that the U.S. justice system does not promote “true justice.”

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Minnesota Professor Objects to Classic Children’s Books Because They Don’t Address Climate Change

Book "Stories of Adventure"

A Minnesota professor recently debated in an editorial published by The New York Times whether it is “fair” to read his daughter classic children’s books because they are set in a natural world that is now “vanishing.”

Paul Bogard, an associate professor of English at Hamline University in St. Paul, wrote in a recent opinion piece, “The wild world my favorite books had encouraged me to love has been under assault.”

The books he refers to are “Where the Wild Things Are,” “Swimmy,” “The Story of Babar,” “A Snowy Day,” and “Make Way for Ducklings.”

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Minnesota Judge Sentences Chauvin to 22.5 Years in Prison for George Floyd Murder

Minnesota Judge Peter Cahill on Friday sentenced former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin to 22-and-a-half years in prison for the May 2020 murder of George Floyd.

A jury in April found Chauvin guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter, at the conclusion of a three-week trial that gained national attention.

Cahill in announcing the sentence urged people to read the legal analysis on how he reached his decision and said the amount of time was not based on “emotion or sympathy.”

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St. Paul Schools Committee Calls for End to School Suspensions After Examining ‘Racial Inequities’

Seven Indigenous students from AIMS middle school participated in the "This is Me: Indigenous in 2020" art exhibition exploring self portraiture in representational, symbolic and abstract work. The exhibition has been located in the Minneapolis U.S. District Court House since November 2020.

St. Paul Public Schools’ Equity Committee recently called for an end to school suspensions among other recommendations as a way to tackle inequities in the district.

The Equity Committee in the St. Paul Public School District was created in 2019 and is led by Superintendent Joe Gothard. The committee meets monthly to identify and examine “racial inequities” and equity disparities, as well as craft recommendations for the school board at large.

During a June 15 St. Paul Public School Board meeting, the Equity Committee brought forward a list of recommendations, including ending the use of suspensions in the district.

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